Our Maine lakefront experts are standing by to help you. Views and news about Maine lakes and lakefront homes See why the Mr. Lakefront team provides superior information and unsurpassed service Read the latest news about lakes and ponds across the state Educate yourself about buying lakefront property Find information about hundreds of Maine lakes and ponds Browse available Maine lakefront properties
Maine Lakefront Property
Our Maine lakefront experts are standing by to help you. Views and news about Maine lakes and lakefront homes See why the Mr. Lakefront team provides superior information and unsurpassed service Read the latest news about lakes and ponds across the state Educate yourself about buying lakefront property Find information about hundreds of Maine lakes and ponds Browse available Maine lakefront properties

Maine Shoreland
Zoning -
A Handbook For Shoreland Owners
A "Must Have" for every Maine lakefront homeowner.
Send us your info and receive this free 42 page handbook:
Name:

*Email:

Phone:

Comment:

*required


FREE ISSUE
Lake Living magazine has been described as "the Downeast Magazine of the Sebago Region"
Click here for a free copy of this award-winning magazine!

WEEKLY UPDATES
Keep tabs on news, events and market changes from the Lake Regions in Maine.
click here to subscribe


Maine Birding
Free Maine Birding Trail info 82 sites for birding are covered in this 26 page brochure.
Click here to request your copy

Fishes of Maine
Do you know the difference between a Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout, and Brown Trout? Find the info here.
Click here to request your copy

Free Buffer Handbook
Get your free Buffer Handbook
Click here to request your copy

Free Septic Guide
Over 95% of all Maine lakefront homes have septic systems. Before you buy learn more.
Click here to request your copy

Maine Travel Guide
Get your free 192 page Offical Travel Planner for visiting Maine. It includes the offical state map.
Click here to request your copy

State Agencies Alert Drivers to Roadside Moose Dangers; May and June Peak Months

April 16, 2012 - Rumford — May and June are the peak months for moose-vehicle collisions, which is why two state agencies began alerting drivers on Thursday to the approaching danger.


As the weather warms, roadsides are one of the first places to turn green throughout Maine. After their winter diet, moose are hungry for salt, which can be found on the side of roads, and in tender green plants.

This brings them in close proximity to vehicles, Lee Kantar, state moose biologist for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, said Thursday afternoon.

“Given the size and mass of moose, the likelihood of serious personal injury is far greater with moose, and thus, it is absolutely critical for drivers to be constantly vigilant during this time of year,” Kantar said.

“Another problem is moose . . . especially young moose . . . who find themselves suddenly on their own because cows now have offspring,” Kantar said.

“Moose in May and June that get into the most trouble are likely yearlings that have been 'kicked off' from the mother, who has calved in May and likely has a calf at heel in June,” he said.

The most likely time for moose-vehicle collisions is from dusk until dawn. From 7 p.m. to midnight is when most occur, Kantar said, because moose move more during the evening after temperatures drop.

Every Maine county records moose-vehicle collisions, of which, almost 80 percent of crashes happen when it's dark and nearly 90 percent occur between dusk and dawn, he said.

To minimize chances of colliding with moose, reduce speed after dark, use high beams whenever possible and buckle up.

“Moose are chocolate-brown in color, which makes them hard to see at night,” Kantar said. “And if you see one, be on guard — they tend to move in groups. If you should see one, slow down, don't try to drive around it, and stay in your vehicle — you put yourself and others at risk.”

Due to the warm winter and lack of snow, deer have been out along roadsides already and getting hit, never having really been penned up in deer yards by heavy snowfall, Chuck Hulsey, state wildlife biologist of Strong, said.

Vegetation is also greening up earlier than usual, he said.

“I would say two weeks early, just around my yard, and that's the kind of food they like when they first come out, those green succulents,” he said.

Terry Karkos, Sun Journal, April 2012


Lakes:
Regions:


Print this story

Email this story

return to Lake News



37 Roosevelt Trail . PO Box 970 . South Casco . ME 04077
Phone: 207-655-8787 . E-mail: info@mrlakefront.net